Wednesday, May 22, 2024

Kifiahs are not permitted at Queen’s Park

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Were seeing this division continue Opposition Leader Marit Stiles told a news conference before the motion was tabled It is not healthy and will only further divide the community

A motion to lift the ban on kifiahs at Queen’s Park failed to gain unanimous support on 18 April. The results came shortly after Ontario Premier Doug Ford repeated his statement in Parliament that the ban on the garment was divisive.

“We’re seeing this division continue,” Opposition Leader Marit Stiles told a news conference before the motion was tabled. It is not healthy and will only further divide the community.

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On April 17, he met with Speaker of the House Ted Arnott to overturn the ban on the garment. The scarf is worn by Palestinians, Muslims and Arabs. Liberal leader Bonnie Crombie and Green Party leader Mike Schreiner have also called for the ban to be lifted.

Styles previously said in a letter to Arnott on April 12 that his caucus members were asked to remove the clothing.

Responding to the letter on April 16, Arnott Palt said, “After extensive research, he has come to the conclusion that the wearing of the kifiya in our legislature at this time is clearly for the purpose of making a political statement.” However, if the proposal to allow the wearing of the garment was unanimously accepted, he would have accepted the decision.

In a motion tabled on April 18, Stylis said, “I asked for a unanimous vote to recognize the culturally important clothing house the Kifayah is for the many people in Ontario’s Palestinian, Muslim and Arab communities.” Also wanted that it should not be considered as a political message or an accessory to creating chaos. I also wanted to allow the wearing of kifayah in the house.

However, the proposal failed on the side. In the legislature, Arnott said, he heard loud “no” votes when he asked for unanimous consent.

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