Wednesday, February 28, 2024

Consultation on Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines opens today

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Ottawa, August 29, 2022 — Updates to Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines (LRDGs) are entering the final stages. The Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA) is holding a four-week, online consultation from Aug. 29 to Sept. 23, 2022, on the findings of the final report.

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Open to everyone in Canada, CCSA is seeking comment on the Update of Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines: Final Report for Public Consultation. The report is the culmination of two years of research and a review of more than 5,000 peer-reviewed studies to ensure that updates to Canada’s alcohol drinking guidelines are drafted using the latest evidence. Feedback is provided by a short, accompanying, online survey.

The final report includes three documents, each with a specific audience focus, but participants are welcomed to provide comments on one, two or all three documents:

  • The Public Summary is intended for the general public.
  • The Technical Summary is intended for health organizations, health professionals (e.g., physicians, nurses, counsellors) and people who would like to learn about the update of the LRDGs, its key takeaways and the risks associated with alcohol.
  • The Technical Report is intended for alcohol scientists, policy makers and healthcare professionals who are interested in understanding the detailed process followed, the types of evidence reviewed and the way the evidence was used to update the LRDGs.

“We want people in Canada to have the latest evidence-based advice on alcohol to support them in making informed decisions about its use,” said Alexander Caudarella, CCSA Chief Executive Officer. “We’re excited to enter these final stages. The feedback we receive will help us ensure the clarity and validity of the final updated Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines we’ll be releasing this fall.”

Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines were originally published by CCSA in November 2011 and were the result of the work of alcohol research experts in Canada. Since then, substantial new research has been completed on the association between alcohol use and physical, mental and social harms. Many countries have updated their guidance on drinking to reflect these advancements in what is known about the risks and benefits associated with alcohol consumption.

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